Gazetteer of New York, 1860 & 1861 page 339
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HAMILTON COUNTY.    339

Its surface is hilly and mountainous. In the several valleys which extend across the town are
numerous lakes. Jerseyfield Lake, upon the s. border, is the principal lake in the s. part. The
Sth, 6th, 7th, and 8th lakes of the Fulton chain, in the
sr. part, discharge their waters into Moose
River. Jones, Deer, Goose, and several other lakes flow into West Canada Creek. Moretaojise-
ville, in the s. part, is a p. o. The Arthurboro Patent was mostly within the limits of this town.
The tract of 50,000 acres purchased by Jonathan Lawrence was also partly in this town.1 The
first settlement was commenced, under the agency of Andrew K. Morehouse, in 1833.2    .    
/

WEULS2—was formed from Mayfield and Northampton, Fulton co., May 28, 1805. Hope was
taken off in 1818, a part of Long Lake in 1837, and Gilman in 1839. A part of Mayfield was
annexed June 19, 1812 ; parts of Mayfield and Northampton in 1816; and parts of Gilman and
Lake Pleasant in 1858. It lies along the
e. border of the co. and forms a part of the hunting
grounds of Northern N. Y. Its s. part is inhabited by a few families on Indian Lake. It is intersected
by mountain ranges separated by deep, narrow valleys. The highest peaks are 2,000 to 2,500 feet
high and are covered by masses of naked rock. The three branches of the Sacondaga unite in the
s. part, forming a large stream. Jessup and Cedar Rivers, in the
n., are large streams. Indian
Lake is a sheet of Water about 6 mi. long
; and further n. is a cluster of small lakes flowing into
the Hudson. There are numerous other small lakes in other parts, known only to hunters. The
soil is light and sandy. Calciferous sandstone appears
in situ above Wells Tillage. Wells, (p.v.)
contains a large tannery, gristmill, sawmill, and 15 dwellings; Piclilevllle, one-half mi. above,
contains 2 churches and 15 dwellings. Settlement began in 1798.3

Acres of Land, Valuation, Population, Dwellings, Families, Freeholders, Schools, Live
Stock, Agricultural Products, and Domestic Manufactures, of Hamilton County.

Acres of Land.

Valuation op 1858.

Population.

1

' 3*

■ Schools.

Names or Towns.

Improved.

'I

0

1
s

Real Estate.

Personal

Property.

Total.

Males.

Females.

■ 1
V

.1

■&

4

Freeholders.

No. of 1
Districts.

Children

taught.

Arietta...................

674

197,760

$75,015

$380

$75,395

77

72

32

32

18

6

31

Gilman..................

803

90,902

46,559

46,559

52

38

21

21

19'

1

21

Hope.....................

Indian Lake...........

6,T29

56,168

65,231'

1,028

66,259

451

371

135

148

116

8

351

Lake Pleasant.........

2,737

150,418

99,046

49,937

550

99,596

49,937

162

138

52

53

33

5

147

Long Lake..............

744

150,835

71

68

28

29

22

3

60

Morehouse..............

1,186#

6,796#

114,099

39,276

39,276

147

128

56

59

51

2

89

■Wells.....................

3,802#

96,313

1,420

97,733

430

338

137

146

93

7

318

Total..............

16,675#

766,978#

471,377

3,378

474,755

1,390

1,153

461

488

352

32

1,017

Names of Towns.

Live Stock.

Agricultural Products.

Domestic Cloths
in yards.

£

Working
Oxen and
Calves.

Cows.

S'

S3

Swine.

Bush, of Grain.

Tons of Hay.

Bushels of .
Potatoes.

05 «S %

%% 1
a Si

Daisy Products.

Winter.

tel

£

£

$

Pounds

Butter.

■§ oS
1 8

§§

Arietta..................

16

92

52

7

27

6

871

444

1,450

3,770

20

Gilman..................

17

109

16

16

652

229

1,247

45

2,900

Hope......................

164

585

306

• 861

205

24

12,475#

1,751#

9,916

2,326

28,803

1,300

Indian Lake............

Lake Pleasant.........

35

193

123

155

89

31

3.348#

586 -

2,641

128

16,935

570

374

Long Lake..............

7

59

36

38

39

152

1,509

141

2,226

3,622

70

Morehouse..............

16

175

98

116

25

1,976#

456#

3,188

7

8,202

317

Wells.....................

83

391

221

304

109

70

6,515

666

4,589

953

19,050

.800

682

Total................

338

1,604

852

1,481

510

'283

27,347#

4,274

25,257

3,459

83,282

2,670

1,463

and the first death, that of a son of Christian Weaver, by a fall¬
ing tree. A gristmill was first built in 1843, by John Cum¬
mings ; and the first tannery, in 1854, by Henry and Theodore
Darken.

8 Named from Joshua Wells, the first settler.

4 Joshua Wells, a native of Long Island, who came on as agent
for the proprietors of Palmer’s Purchase, in 1798, built the first
mills. Isaac and Joshua Brown came with Wells, and kept
“ bachelors’ hall” several summers before any families came in.
Amasa Gage, Giles Vanderhoof, Nicholas Bradt, John Francisco,

Elnathan Lacy, Michael Overacken, Isaiah Whitman, Rose,

and others, were early settlers.  Van Zandt kept the first

store; and Platt Whitman built the first tannery, in 1825.


1

The Arthurhoro Patent included S townships, one 10 and
the others each 8 mi. square. It was granted to Arthur Noble,
Feb. 15,1787, for 1 shilling per acre. He endeavored to effect
the settlement of 100 families, but failed. The tract to Mr.
Lawrence was granted for 3# shillings per acre.

2

He began a small village 1 mi. w. of Morehouseville, called

3

“Bethunevillebut the project failed. Dennis and Henry
Tucker, Theodore Marnche, Ezra Combs, Jonathan Tift, Chris¬
tian Weaver, Elias Rickard, J. B. Reily, and B. Bennett were
early settlers. The first birth was that of a son of Wm. Baker;
the first marriage, that of David Bushnell and Miss Squires;


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