Brookes’ Universal Gazetteer, page 671
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SER    671    SER

Senez, a town of France, department of Low-
er Alps, seated in a rough barren coi.ntry, 15 m
S. S. E. of Digne.

Senftenberg, a town of Prussia, in Lower Lu-
satia, with a castle, 35 m. N. N. E. of Meissen.

Senlis, a town of France, department of Oise,
sealed on the river Donette, and almost surroun-
ed by a forest, 20 m. N. W. of Meaux and 27
N. E. of Paris.

Sennaar, a kingdom of Eastern Africa, bound-
ed E. and S. by Abyssinia, Wr. by Darfur, and N.
by Dongola and the independent districts of Nu-
bia. The Nile flows through this immense plain
above a mile broad, full to the very brim, but nev-
er overflowing. For several miies from the banks
of this river, the soil is of very remarkable fertili-
ty ; and at the time of the rains, about the end of
August and beginning of September, the country
assumes a most delightful appearance, resembling
the pleasantest parts of Holland. Soon after the
rains cease, the dhourra ripens, the leaves turn
yellow and rot, the lakes putrefy, smell, and are
full of vermin ; all the beauty disappears, and bare
scorched Nubia returns, with all its terrors of poi-
sonous winds and moving sands, glowing and
ventilated with sultry blasts. The trade consists
chief!}7 in exchanging the various productions of
interior Africa with those of Egypt and Arabia.
The kingdom of Sennaar was founded by a body
of Shilluk negroes in 1504. The government is
despotic, but the king may lawfully be put to
death whenever the chief officers decide that his
reigh is no longer a public benefit.

Sennaar, a city of Nubia, and capital of the
above kingdom, is 5 m. in circumference, and
very populous. The houses are chiefly of one
story, with flat roofs ; but the suburbs contain
only cottages covered with reeds. The palace
is surrounded by high walls, and is a confused
heap of buildings. The heats are almost insup-
portable in the day-time, except in the rainy
season, at which time the air is unwholesome.
The commodities are elephants’ teeth, tamarinds,
civet., tobacco, and gold dust. Thereis a market
near the palace, whore slaves are sold ; the fe-
males sit on one side, and the males on another ;
the Egyptians buy great numbers of them every
year. The merchandise required here consists of
spices, paper, brass, hardware, glass beads, and
a black drug which is used to colour the eye-
brows. The women of quality have slight gar-
ments of silk, and wear rings of various metals on
their hair, arms, legs, ears, and fingers. Women
of a low rank, and girls, have cloths wrapped
round them from the waist to the knees. The
men go almost naked. Sennaar is seated on an
eminence, near the river Nile. Lon*. 33. 0. E.,
lat. 13. 4. N.    ot

Sens, a town of France, department of Yonne,
and an archbishop’s see, with a handsome Gothic
cathedral. Several ecclesiastical councils have
been held here; in that of 1140 the well
known Abelard was condemned. Sens was ta-
ken by the allies in 1814, but soon after evacua-
ted. It is seated in a fertile country, at the con-
flux of the Vanne with the Yonne, 25 m. N. of
Auxerre and 80 S. E. of Pais. Long. 3. 17. E.,
lat. 48. 12 N.

Sepulveda, a town of Spain, in Old Castile,
30 m. N. E. of Segovia.

Sera, or Sira, a town of Hindoostan, in My-
sore, with a stone fort of a good size. It is the
principal place in the central division of the
rajah s dominions N. of the Cavery and carries
on a considerable inland commerce. The whole
of the cloth made here is used in the neighbour-
hood. Since the restoration of the rajah, in 1799,
the fort has been garrisoned by British troops
48 m. S. E. of Chitteldroog, 48 N. of Scrringapa
tarn. Long. 76. 53. E., lat. 13. 36. N.

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Serai, a town of European Turkey, capital of
Bosnia, and the see of a Catholic bishop, appoint-
ed by the king of Hungary. It is a large com-
mercial place, and is seated on the river Bcsna
130 m. W. S- W. of Belgrade. Long. 19. 15. E.,
lat. 44. 14. N.

Serampore, a town of Bengal, belonging to the
Danes. The houses are of brick, plastered with
mortar, and have flat roofs, with balconies and
Venetian windows. The inhabitants carry on
some trade with Europe, China, &c. But the
town is principally distinguished as the early seat
of the Baptist mission in India, and as the resi-
dence of British subjects who take refuge here
from their creditors. It is seated on the WL
bank of the Hooghly. 12 m. N. of Calcutta.

Scrdobol, a town of Russia, in the government
of Wiburg, on the lake Ladoga, 60 m. N. N. E.
of Wiburg.

Sered, or Szsered, a town of Hungary, on the
river Waag, 30 m. E. N. E. of Presburg.

Serfo, or Serf ante, an island of the Grecian
Archipelago, 8 m. long and 5 broad, and full of
mountains and rocks, in which are mines of iron
and loadstone. The inhabitants are all Greeks,
and have but one town, called St. Nicholo,'
which is a poor place. 50 m. N. W. of Naxaia.
Lon*. 25.10. E., lat. 37. 19. N.

Scrgag, a town of Russia, in the government
of Niznei Novogorod, 48 m. S. E. of Niznei No-
vogorod.

Sergippe, a province on the coast of Brazil
to the S. of Pernambuco. It produces sugar
and tobacco in considerable quantities and has
some silver mines.

Sergippe, a sea-port of Brazil, capital of the
above province, seated at the mouth of the Ser •
gippe, 120 m. N. E. of St. Salvador. Long. 37.

44. W., lat. 12. 10. S.

Serignan, a town of France, department of He-
rault, at the mouth of the Ombre, in the gulf of
Lions, 8 m. S. E. of Beziers.

Serinagur, or Guwal, a province of Hindoostan,
situated chiefly between 30. and 32. of N. lat. and
between 77. and 79. of E. long. It is estimated at
140 m. in length by 60 in breadth ; and is govern-
ed by a rajah, under the protection of the British.

Serinagur, the capital of the above province, is
about three quarters of a mile long, the houses
built of rough stone and mud, and covered with
slate, but seldom more than two stories high. The
streets are narrow and dirty, but there are some
good shops. It is situate in a valley on the river
Alcanauda, which is crossed by a bridge of ropes.
On the opposite side of the river, at the village of
Ranihut, is a temple sacred to Raja Ishwara,
principally inhabited by dancing women, whose
lives are devoted to prostitution as a religious
service ! Serinagur is 38 m. from Hard war.
Lon*. 79. 18. E., lat. 30. 11. N.

Seringapatam, a city of Hindoostan, the modern
capital of Mysore, is situate in an island, 3 m.
long, and 1 broad, formed by the Cavery, which
is here a large and rapid river, with a wide and
rocky channel. The streets are narrow and
confused, and the generality of the houses mean.
The city is strongly fortified; notwithstanding
which, lord Cornw7allis, in 1792, here compelled







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