Brookes’ Universal Gazetteer, page 552
Click on the image to view a larger, bitmap (.bmp) image suitable for printing.

HOME PAGE ... REFERENCE PAGE ... THIS GAZETTEER’S PAGE



Click on the image above for a larger, bitmap image suitable for printing.


NOR    552    NOR

contains fragments of monuments as ancient as
the 14th century. Vast quantities of lime are
made here, and great numbers of extraneous fos-
sils have been dug up.

Northleach, a town in Gloucestershire, Eng.
seated near the source of the Lech, 25 m. E. of
Gloucester and 81 AV. by N. of London.

Northop, a village of Wales, in Flintshire, 3 m.
S. E. of Flint; noted for its manufactures of
coarse earthenware, firebricks, &c.

Northumberland, the most northern county of
England. In the Saxon heptarchy it was a part
of the kingdom of the Northumbrians, which con-
tained also the counties of York, Lancaster, Dur-
ham, Cumberland, and AVestmoreland, and recei-
ved its name from being situate N. of the Hum-
bert It is of a triangular form, 64 m. in extreme
length and 50 in extreme breadth; bounded on
the E. hy the German Ocean. The soil is va-
rious ; the E. part is fruitful in most sorts of corn,
with rich meadows on the banks of the rivers;
but the W. part is mostly heathy and mountain-
ous. The S. E. part abounds with thick seams
of coal; and the S. W. angle has rich lead mines.
Limestone and iron ore abound in various parts.
Alnwick is the capital; but the largest town is
Newcastle.

Northumberland Islands, a chain of islands in
the S. Pacific, near the N. E. coast of New Hol-
land. Long. 150. E., lat. 22. S.

Northumberland Strait, the S. part of the gulf
of St. Lawrence, between the island of St. John
and the coast of New Brunswick and Nova
Scotia.

Northwieh, a town ip Cheshire, Eng. with a
cotton manufacture, and considerable salt-works;
seated on the Dan, at its junction with the Weev-
er, 20 m. N. E. of Chester and 174 N. W. of
London.

Norton Sound, an inlet of the sea, on the W.
coast of N. America, discovered by Cook in his
last voyage. The entrance is between Cape
Denbigh on the E. and Cape Danby on the AA’.,
about 70 m. distant, both lying in lat. 64. 30. N.,
and the latter in long. 162. 55. AV.

North, a township of Harrison Co. Ohio. Pop.
1,215.

Aorth Amenia, p.v. Dutchess, Co. N. Y.

Northampton, a town of England, the capital of
Northamptonshire, with some manufactures. It
stands on the Nen,
66 m. N. W. London.

Northamptonshire, a county of England con-
taining 1,017 sq. m. Pop. 162,483.

Northampton, ph. Hampshire Co. Mass. on the
Connecticut, 95 m. W. Boston. Pop. 3,613. It
is handsomely built, and very pleasantly situated
in the neighbourhood of Mount Holyoke, which
see. Here are woolen manufactories. The Farm-
ington Canal is designed to extend from New Ha-
ven to this pdace.

A’orthampton, a township of Montgomery Co.
N. Y. 60 m. N. W. Albany. Pop. 1,392; a town-
ship in Bucks Co. Pa. and Burlington Co. N. J. ;
ph. Lehigh Co. Pa. 55 m. N. W. Philad.; p.v. Por-
tage Co. Ohio ; p.v. Northampton Co. N. C. '

Northampton, a county of the E. District of Vir-
ginia. Pop. 6,644. Eastville is the capital; a
county of N. Carolina. Pop. 13.103.

North Hampton, ph. Rockingham Co. N. H.
on the coast, 7 m. S. W. Portsmouth. Pop. 767.

North Blenhein, ph. Schoharie Co. N. Y. 55
m. S. W. Albany.

Northborough, ph. Worcester Co. Mass. 36 m.
W. Boston. Pop. 994.

ME* i>7«aumr-        .-»    -    .........

lllllllll

lllllllll

lllllllll

lllllllll

lllllllll

lllllllll

lllllllll

lllllllll

lllllllll

lllllllll

lllllllll

lllllllll

llllllll|l

cm j

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1

0 1

1 1

2 1

60

H*

4


Northbridge, ph. Worcester Co. Mass. 45 m. S
W. Boston. Pop. 1,053.

North Brookfield, ph. Worcester Co. Mass. 68
m. W. Boston. Pop. 1,241.

North Branch, p.v. Somerset Co. N. J.

N'orth Bridgewater, ph. Plymouth Co. Mass. 28
m. S. Boston. Pop. 1,953.

North Bend, p.v. Hamilton Co. Ohio, on the
Ohio, in the S. W. corner of the state.

North Carolina, one of the United States, bound-
ed N. by Virginia, E. by the ocean, S. by the
ocean and S. Carolina and W. by Tennessee. It
extends from 33.50. to 36. 30. N. lat. and from 75.

45. to 84. W. long. 435 m. in length from E. to W.
and 180 in breadth. It contains 43,800 sq. m
Nearly all the state is level: in the west the Blue
Ridge of mountains crosses the country from Vir-
ginia to S. Carolina. It is watered by the Cho-
wan and Roanoke rivers which rise in Virginia
and flows through this state into Albermarle
Sound; by the Pamlico and Cape Fear rivers which
flow to the sea m the eastern and southern parts,
and the Yadkin which passes into S. Carolina.
A number of low sandy islands are scattered
along the coast and inclose several large sounds,
as Pamlico, Albermarle and Currituck ; yet the
entrances to these, and the mouths of the rivers
are obstructed with shoals, and there is not a good
harbour in the state. The soil is to a great extent
sandy and poor, with extensive swampy tracts ;
there are however, fertile districts here and there,
and the banks of the rivers are generally produc-
tive. In the western parts the soil is much the
best. The Great Dismal Swamp lies between
this state and Virginia and covers a space of 150,
000 acres. In its neighbourhood is another called
the Little Dismal Swamp.

The mineral region of this state has lately at-
tracted great attention. Mines of gold have been
discovered which have already proved highly
productive : these mines are not confined to the
limits of North Carolina but extend into the ad-
joining states of A’irginia, South Carolina, Ten-
nesee, Georgia and Alabama. They are comput-
ed to cover more than
1,000 sq. m. of surface.
The mines in this state are very active and em-
ploy about 20,000 men. They are not sunk very

deep but are wrought extensively in a horizonta.
direction. The gold is also found on the sur-
face, in grains among the sand and gravel, and is
obtained by washing the earth. The particles
seldom exceed in size the head of a pin, although
occasionally larger pieces are found, and in one
instance a lump weighing 28 pounds was discov-
ered. There are a great number of mills in
this state for grinding the ore, which are driven
by water or steam. The greater part of the gold
is sent to Europe. The quantity afforded by all the
mines is not known with any accuracy, although






PREVIOUS PAGE ... NEXT PAGE

This page was written in HTML using a program
written in Python 3.2